Reid puts it right

Sacked Argyle boss responds to Ridsdale remarks

Last Updated: 09/10/11 2:41pm

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Peter Reid has hit back at Peter Ridsdale, after he was sacked from Plymouth because in the acting chairman's words, "paying the heating bill was not enough".

"I only paid the bill because when I walked into the football club people were freezing - they had coats on. And because of the way I'd been brought up I thought that's the right thing to do. I never let that out publicly, I never wanted a song and dance about it, so for Peter Ridsdale to mention that is ridiculous. "
Peter Reid Quotes of the week

The former Manchester City, Sunderland and Leeds boss was axed nine games into the League Two season after picking up just a single point.

Reid's reign at Home Park was overshadowed by administration and the very real threat of the club going out of business, with players and creditors alike, not being paid.

Relegation from League One was inevitable and the manager himself admits results were not good enough this term, but took exception to a recent interview Ridsdale did with Sky Sports News, in which he claimed to be surprised at the "national outcry" at the sacking, "just because he had paid the heating bill".

Reid was shown the footage on Goals on Sunday and although Ridsdale claimed to have an "an outstanding relationship" with the man he employed at Leeds, the reception his remarks got suggested otherwise.

"First of all it's all about football matches as we know, but when you have to sell players it is difficult," said Reid.

"Peter's record as a chairman, as we all know, is fantastic. He's saved many football clubs and long may that continue! I think I went out with him about five times for dinner - as we are great friends - but I think I paid five times.

"I do think the club might have gone without his involvement, I've got to say. But some of the things I don't understand about administration are that an administrator gets paid while some of the staff don't and when you're selling players an administrator can employ an agent as a "football advisor" and he gets paid, which happened at Plymouth Argyle.

"I don't understand that. It might be legally correct, but morally? I think the money should got to people at the football club.

"I can understand when he says 'hey it's football results' but do me a favour Peter! He knows what we went through at the football club. It's a bit harsh, that.

"I only paid the bill because when I walked into the football club people were freezing - they had coats on. And because of the way I'd been brought up I thought that's the right thing to do.

"I never let that out publicly, I never wanted a song and dance about it, so for him to mention that is ridiculous."

Motivating

Reid, who had 15 months in charge of the Pilgrims, also auctioned off his 1986 FA Cup runners-up medal to help club staff whose wages had not been paid.

And speaking in-depth about life behind the scenes at the cash-strapped club, he admitted that at times, results were the last thing on his mind.

Selling players, dealing with unpaid players and even trying to find a kit for the first game of the season were just some of the things that Reid had to contend with. But he did so, he said, because the support from the local community, left him with no option but to see it through to the end.

"When I went in they'd been relegated from the Championship and I was told I had to cut the wage bill - which was obvious - but I didn't know the extent of the problems the club were in," he said.

"It wasn't until a couple of months in; there were some delays on the salary payments and it just went from bad to worse. I think in January we were 12th, six points off the play-offs with a game in hand, and then I had to sell players. Little Noony (Craig Noon) went to Brighton, (Bradley) Wright-Phillips goes, then we went into administration and got the 10-point deduction.

"When players aren't getting paid it is difficult motivating them. These lads aren't like Premier League players; some of them have got mortgages and deadlines to pay them and I think it affected them.

"But at the start of this season we had nine players when we started - we couldn't have a five-a-side. We didn't have a kit until a firm came in, Bent Brothers I think they were called, and they wrote a cheque out to get us some kit for the first game, which was fantastic.

"The whole community were brilliant in terms of getting behind the club, because it was that close to going out of business. That was the reason I stayed because football-wise it was so, so difficult.

"Football is a results business, but there were circumstances that made it difficult for everyone at the club and certainly the manager that has to deal with it, with players struggling for money."

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