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Remy reveals frustration

Nice star unhappy at lack of move

By Patrick Haond.   Last Updated: 05/02/10 11:00am

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Remy: No move

Remy: No move

Sky Bet

Loic Remy admits he was disappointed not to see a move to Lyon in January finalised.

The striking starlet actually began his career with Lyon, but after jut a dozen performances at the Stade Gerland, and a loan stint at Lens, he was sold to Nice.

Since moving to Nice, Remy has impressed and now he has been strongly linked with a move back to Lyon.

Arsene Wenger is also believed to be keen on taking the 23-year-old to Arsenal, whilst Rennes also made their interest known during January.

But Remy has revealed that he had his heart set on a move back to Lyon, and he is not happy that the transfer did not transpire.

"Such a soap opera is frustrating and exhausting. You realise a football player is just a toy," Remy told France Football.

"On Monday, Nice's sport director Eric Roy told me: 'The transfer (at Lyon) will be sorted out'.

"But I am not playing for Lyon. When you show such an interest, you should finalise it.

"I have never asked anything, but L'OL has not been fair. I was keen to come back, seeing their strong insistence."

Remy confirmed both Arsenal and Rennes wanted him, but his preference was Lyon.

He added: "There was Arsenal too, a club that makes me dream and I admire.

"It is nice to know they think about you and Rennes was a serious contact as I rate their coach Frederic Antonetti a lot and I was keen to join him, but Lyon was my priority, my family is living there."

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