Scudamore calls for calm

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Richard Scudamore believes Premier League clubs are united in their desire to curb refereeing conflicts.

Premier League hope to 'Get on with the game'

Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore believes top flight clubs are united in their desire to curb refereeing conflicts. The new season will kick off this weekend in conjunction with the 'Get on with the game' campaign. All 20 clubs in the Premier League have signed the charter which will give team captains greater responsibility for controlling their team-mates and respecting the decisions of the match officials, and insist that the skippers are present when team sheets are handed in so that they can receive any specific instructions. Television monitors will also be removed from technical areas to avoid flashpoints involving members of coaching staff. Scudamore is confident that the new plans will benefit the game and help to restore some of the credibility which has been lost in recent years.

Unacceptable

"I have been in this job 10 years now and I sense a mood for something to happen," he said. "If we had mentioned this three years ago I think the reaction would have been different. "Now everyone - club chairmen, managers, players, officials, fans, media - are all saying we saw things last season that overstepped the mark. "If we see unacceptable behaviour, we should make it unacceptable."
Venom
Scudamore was also keen to point out that referees will be under pressure to ensure that they get key decisions correct in order to prevent heated confrontation with players. "It is not a one-way street," he said. "We are not just saying managers and players have to behave. Referees have to meet players halfway as well and fans have to back off a little bit in terms of the vitriol. "I do not want to take the passion out of the game but it would be nice to take some of the venom away."
Passion
Scudamore went on to question those that feel aggression is a by-product of passion, pointing out that rivalries on and off the pitch do not need to descend into abuse. "We have reached the stage where the whole situation needs correcting," he added. "We need the excesses skimming off the top. "It is difficult to say that without making it appear that we are trying to sanitise everything. That is not what we are saying at all. "We want the passion and rivalries. What we don't want is some of that blatant disrespect and abuse."

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