Wenger happy with spending plans

Image: Arsene Wenger: Happy not to be 'crazy'

Arsene Wenger admits that he has no qualms about being regarded as 'crazy' for not spending huge money at Arsenal.

Frenchman insists he won't be forced into going 'crazy'

Arsene Wenger admits that he has no qualms about being regarded as 'crazy' for not spending huge money at Arsenal. Wenger has again come under criticism from a section of his own fans for not spending in the last 12-months, despite big-money sales of the likes of Cesc Fabregas and Samir Nasri. Arsenal again look set to go another season with a trophy, last picking up silverware in 2005. Arsenal remain committed to their self-sustaining business model, driven by revenues from their 60,000-seater Emirates Stadium, on which they have a long-term debt repayment plan at a low, fixed interest rate. The Gunners are again expected to report an operating profit when their latest set of financial figures are published next week. Wenger, though, cannot fathom why Arsenal continue to be lambasted for spending within their means. "What is unbelievable is that we run the model that should be absolutely normal and we look crazy. That is crazy," said Wenger. "People will do anything stupid, but we are not crazy, we are all right. We spend 1 if we make 1 and [then people say] 'what are they doing?' That is what is absolutely mad in our world, but the whole world is bankrupt because of that."

Wages

Wenger accepts Arsenal cannot compete with the wages which other teams pay, a case proven in point over recent seasons with the departures of the likes of Nasri and Gael Clichy to rivals Manchester City. "Last year we were very close to the top and there was a rupture in the building of our team with losing [captain Cesc] Fabregas [to Barcelona], Nasri and [Jack] Wilshere [to injury]," he said. "We could compete with anybody in Europe with our midfield." Wenger added: "When we play a young team you have to understand as well that we have chosen that policy. "What is difficult to take once you get close is that the players move, and that is where we are in trouble. "It is not the policy, it is not keeping our players once they arrive in a mature way."

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