Hillsborough: This is not the end of process, says Theresa May

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The Home Secretary Theresa May explains which type of criminal prosecutions could come from the Hillsborough inquests

The families of the 96 victims of the Hillsborough disaster will continue to receive legal aid as they pursue further action over the tragedy, the Government has said.

Home Secretary Theresa May told MPs "this is not the end of the process" as she set out the Government's response to an inquest jury's ruling that the Liverpool supporters were unlawfully killed.

The jury concluded the behaviour of fans was not a factor in the tragedy, which happened when supporters were crushed before Liverpool's FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest on April 15, 1989.

Relatives of Hillsborough victims after hearing the conclusions of the inquests
Image: Relatives of Hillsborough victims after hearing the conclusions of the inquests

The jury also found errors by the police and ambulance service had "caused or contributed" to Britain's worst sporting disaster.

Any decision on charges by the CPS is expected to follow within three to six months.

Mrs May said: "I cannot comment in detail on matters that may lead to a criminal investigation

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David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn praise the courage of the families affected by the Hillsborough disaster

"I can however say that the offences under investigation include gross negligence, manslaughter, misconduct in public office, perverting the course of justice and perjury, as well offences under the Safety Of Sports Grounds Act 1975 and the Health And Safety At Work Act 1974."

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She went on: "The authorities that should have been trusted have laid blame and tried to protect themselves instead of acting in the public interest.

"No one should have to endure what the families and survivors have been through."

Hillsborough inquests verdict
Image: Relatives outside court on Tuesday

Each of the 96 victims of the disaster will be remembered later during a vigil in Liverpool.

The names and ages of those who died will be read outside St George's Hall where a memorial emblazoned with the words Truth and Justice stands over a row of 96 lanterns.

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Barrister Michael Mansfield QC has represented most of the Hillsborough families

Dean of Liverpool, Reverend Dr Pete Wilcox, said: "There is a feeling here in Liverpool the Independent Panel disclosures in 2012 brought truth, the inquest verdicts have brought justice - there remains, I think, the question of accountability.

"Who is going to take responsibility for not just what happened on that day, but for the fact that it's taken 27 years for us to reach this stage?"

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The families of the 96 Liverpool fans killed at Hillsborough react to the inquests

Prime Minister David Cameron praised the victims' families' "courage, patience and resolve".

"It's wrong that the families had to wait for so long and to fight so hard just to get to the truth," he told MPs during Prime Minister's Questions.

"They have never faltered in the pursuit of the truth and we all owe them a great debt of gratitude."

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